Anxi Iron Goddess of Mercy (Tie Guan Ying) Floral Oolong

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Oolong Tea
Flavors
Floral, Nutty, Sweet
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Medium
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by teepland
Average preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 8 g 16 oz / 473 ml

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  • “At first, I wasn’t sure about this tea. The tea leaves are all tightly hand-rolled into small balls, but they took longer than I expected to unfurl in the water. I therefore ended up drinking it...” Read full tasting note
    90

From MeiMei Fine Teas

Tie Guan Ying is one of the most revered and sought after oolong teas in China. Sourced directly from the master Zhou in Anxi, Fujian province, this tea has high floral fragrance, smooth and delightful complex taste. Oolong tea has many health benefits, most known as skinny tea.

It is named for the Chinese Goddess of Mercy, Guan Yin, based on a legend. A magnificent tea, not just because of its unique name, but also for its strong floral fragrance and delightfully complex taste. However, the making of Tie Guan Ying is very complex, involving as many as eight steps. This tea is harvested in Autumn, in De Qing of Anxi county, Fujian province. Tie Guan Ying produced from the autumn harvest produces a stronger fragrance than the tea produced in the spring. This tea is hand-rolled into small, jade colored balls.

High quality Tie Guan Ying presents three distinctive qualities: fragrance, fullness, and aftertaste. The caffeine level of Tie Guan Ying is stronger than green tea, but lower than black tea which is ideal for delivering moderate and consistent levels of energy, both in the morning and afternoon.

About MeiMei Fine Teas View company

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1 Tasting Note

90
81 tasting notes

At first, I wasn’t sure about this tea. The tea leaves are all tightly hand-rolled into small balls, but they took longer than I expected to unfurl in the water. I therefore ended up drinking it grandpa style rather than the Western style brew I had initially started in my teapot.

Once the leaves did unfurl, the leaves were smaller than I expected as well, and looked much more fragile than the firm leaves I’ve found in other hand-rolled oolongs. Closer inspection, though, revealed no stems—my steeping was entirely full leaves (slightly torn around the edges but not broken). That was nice to discover!

The liquor itself has a sweet flavor to it—both floral and nutty at the same time. The floral flavor is stronger than the nutty flavor, but they both are there. It is nuttier than the Tung Ting oolong I drank last week but that adds something extra to this tea. I could see this being a tea that would last through repeated steepings (although I can’t attempt that today).

Overall, I am deeply satisfied with this tea, as the quality shows in both flavor and in appearance. I look forward to coming back to this tea again throughout this spring and summer.

NOTE: The vendor website notes that this shipment was harvested in October, 2017

Flavors: Floral, Nutty, Sweet

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 8 g 16 OZ / 473 ML

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