2014 Chawangpu Jingmai Gu Shu Huang Pian

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Fruity, Honey, Kale, Mineral, Musty
Sold in
Not available
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by DigniTea
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 7 g 3 oz / 100 ml

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3 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Drinking the loose leaf version of this. The first two steeps had a strong musty basement aroma and flavor, so I tossed them. It fades in later steeps and gives way to honey, kale, and mineral...” Read full tasting note
    86
  • “I did enjoy this fruity Jingmai Gu Shu Huang Pian on hot days, but not as much as I liked the 2016 Spring “Lao Man E” Flash steeped in a Jian Shui 120 ml dragon egg teapot. Update: After breaking...” Read full tasting note
  • “First review, yay! I was going to go with a familiar ripe b/c something warm and comforting seemed in order after two days in a row at the dentist. But then I changed my mind and went with this tea...” Read full tasting note

From Cha Wang Shop

2014 Chawangpu Jingmai Gu Shu Huang Pian Raw 200g
Production date : March to mid-April 2014; stone pressed Jan. 2015
Harvest area: Da Ping Zhang area, Jingmai Da Zhai village
Tea is from this area of Jingmai is considered some of the finest tea available. Jingmai mountain is famous for middle/little leaf tea (中小叶种茶) which is popular for its sweet taste and floral aroma. Jingmai Da Zhai is one of the most famous villages and has the biggest ancient tea tree garden in Jingmai mountain, especially Da Ping Zhang area. This raw puerh cake is a selection of older tea leaves (Huang Pian – yellow leaves, or Da Ye Zi). Older leaves from the hundred year old trees became bright yellow, red or orange tinted, so the people would sort out those leaves according to the production standard. 100% of this material comes from pure ancient tea trees.

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3 Tasting Notes

86
317 tasting notes

Drinking the loose leaf version of this. The first two steeps had a strong musty basement aroma and flavor, so I tossed them. It fades in later steeps and gives way to honey, kale, and mineral flavors with a bit of fruityness and floral aroma. This is mellow and easy drinking.

Those of you who have the cake, does it smell/taste musty at first? For me that was the biggest downside to this tea.

Flavors: Fruity, Honey, Kale, Mineral, Musty

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 7 g 3 OZ / 100 ML
southwestender

Not a fan of basement aroma so I’m glad the cake I received didn’t smell or taste musty.

tperez

Good to hear your cake didn’t have that smell, I think I’ll have to get me one. While the basement-y-ness didn’t bother me a whole lot, it was enough to make me question whether I wanted to buy more. I want to give their Manzhuan huang pian a try as well.

southwestender

That reminds me, I have a cake of 2016 Manzhuan Gu Shu Huang Pian in the crock. :-D

tperez

Let me know how it is!

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81 tasting notes

I did enjoy this fruity Jingmai Gu Shu Huang Pian on hot days, but not as much as I liked the 2016 Spring “Lao Man E”

Flash steeped in a Jian Shui 120 ml dragon egg teapot.

Update:
After breaking the cake and storing it in a Jian Shui jar for several months with a small Boveda pack, the tea changed. For want of the right word it became richer.

Also, I used a porcelain gaiwan to brew, I could discern more of the leafs’ nuances that way.

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107 tasting notes

First review, yay! I was going to go with a familiar ripe b/c something warm and comforting seemed in order after two days in a row at the dentist. But then I changed my mind and went with this tea because I’ve been curious about Huang Pian for awhile and it smelled really good. Wet leaf aroma is sweet fruity grassy spinach & hay. The liquor is a pale yellow; the flavor is wonderfully light and sweet, with a pleasantly light kuwei (I learned that term from Grill, thanks Grill!). It’s floral but not obnoxiously so. After several steeps I’m not feeling much in the way of qi. My sense is that this is a lovely tea for a summer day… too bad it’s November, lol. This is also a lovely tea for the commitment phobic, because after 7 or 8 steeps it’s pretty flower water/done. There is some magic in those first few steeps though. And I think when I have this tea again, I’ll up my leaf to water ratio a bit from 4.5g/100ml and see what happens.

tanluwils

My first raw pu’er ever was huang pian. They’re a great intro and always nice to have on hand. Due to the dubtle characteristics of huang pian I would experiment pushing the leaf/water ratio to 6-7g/100ml. I just may pick up a cake…

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