95

Splurged on this one, and figured it be good if they are keeping this vintage around for a slightly higher price. I’ve only begun drinking it tonight, but the aroma and flavor are the right mix of delicate and full. Rounded texture, and the tea opens up at an even pace after 20 seconds, slightly getting bigger, and not revealing its secrets and layers immediately.

Coconut shells and meat comes to mind every time, with some lime qualities that I’d associate with a green Qin Xin they described, with a creamy texture. There are some similarities to Camelia Sinensis Lishan, though this one is more heavy in the coconut department so far. It’s interesting they wrote caramel in the notes because I usually don’t get that for most green oolongs. I am for this one, and it’s spinachy milk water so far that I am enjoying slowly. Kinda reminds me of Irish Cream somehow…exaggeration probably. I will add more to the notes as I continue tonights session.

I saved some for Leafhopper in the trade, and I look forward to seeing what she thinks.

Adding more to this, it does fade out kinda quick after steep 4. I did it again western at 2 minutes, and it was smooth and consistent.

Flavors: Coconut, Cream, Creamy, Irish Cream, Lily, Lime, Milk, Spinach, Thick

Leafhopper

I’m glad you included it in the trade because I was drooling over the description. Coconut gets me every time.

Daylon R Thomas

Same. I wanted to give you the opportunity to try this company out because their sourcing is really exceptional. I will add that this one is not as flavor forward or long lasting as like say What-Chas, but it does pretty well western to get the smooth caramel coconut spinach combo. It’s really forgiving, so I might tumbler or grandpa it to see if it keeps the flavor.

Leafhopper

I’ve never Western steeped Taiwanese high mountain oolongs, except at the beginning of my tea journey when I didn’t know any better. They’re so pricy that I want to get the most out of them. Out of curiosity, what are your parameters for Western steeping gaoshan?

Leafhopper

Also, this company has a free shipping threshold of 70 euros, so I very well may make an order when I’ve finished more of my spring 2021 oolongs. They have a Shan Lin Xi Black and a white tea from Jun Chiyabari, among other interesting things.

On a related note, have any of you had any luck getting rid of the VAT when importing tea from European vendors outside the EU? Apparently, they can’t do it on their own and need to go through courier services, which often charge as much in brokerage fees as the original VAT amount. Any advice would be appreciated.

Daylon R Thomas

Um, I paid around 9 euoros the previous time I ordered from them, so it wasn’t as bad as I expected. As for lishans and other high mountains that I know will do well with, I use 3-4 grams and never exceed three minutes occasionally bringin the temp down to 180-185, 5 grams if I got a 14-16 oz tumbler. I only do western for a tea if I know it’s not astringent and flexible, and I usually brew it between 1-2 minutes, 3 minutes if it’s taking its time to open up. I actually have been able to rebrew the tea quite a few times doing it that way, but again, I only do it with the ones I’ve got several amounts of that I can experiment with. I will also do it for the weaker teas, or the ones that usually need grammage above 6 grams to open up. I know that’s not exact step by step instructions, but I hope it gives you an idea of what I work with. I also brewed this one western 1 minute and 15 the first time, 2 min, 3 min, 4, 5, and then grandpa to get it. Gong fu parameters are better to get to it first, though.

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Comments

Leafhopper

I’m glad you included it in the trade because I was drooling over the description. Coconut gets me every time.

Daylon R Thomas

Same. I wanted to give you the opportunity to try this company out because their sourcing is really exceptional. I will add that this one is not as flavor forward or long lasting as like say What-Chas, but it does pretty well western to get the smooth caramel coconut spinach combo. It’s really forgiving, so I might tumbler or grandpa it to see if it keeps the flavor.

Leafhopper

I’ve never Western steeped Taiwanese high mountain oolongs, except at the beginning of my tea journey when I didn’t know any better. They’re so pricy that I want to get the most out of them. Out of curiosity, what are your parameters for Western steeping gaoshan?

Leafhopper

Also, this company has a free shipping threshold of 70 euros, so I very well may make an order when I’ve finished more of my spring 2021 oolongs. They have a Shan Lin Xi Black and a white tea from Jun Chiyabari, among other interesting things.

On a related note, have any of you had any luck getting rid of the VAT when importing tea from European vendors outside the EU? Apparently, they can’t do it on their own and need to go through courier services, which often charge as much in brokerage fees as the original VAT amount. Any advice would be appreciated.

Daylon R Thomas

Um, I paid around 9 euoros the previous time I ordered from them, so it wasn’t as bad as I expected. As for lishans and other high mountains that I know will do well with, I use 3-4 grams and never exceed three minutes occasionally bringin the temp down to 180-185, 5 grams if I got a 14-16 oz tumbler. I only do western for a tea if I know it’s not astringent and flexible, and I usually brew it between 1-2 minutes, 3 minutes if it’s taking its time to open up. I actually have been able to rebrew the tea quite a few times doing it that way, but again, I only do it with the ones I’ve got several amounts of that I can experiment with. I will also do it for the weaker teas, or the ones that usually need grammage above 6 grams to open up. I know that’s not exact step by step instructions, but I hope it gives you an idea of what I work with. I also brewed this one western 1 minute and 15 the first time, 2 min, 3 min, 4, 5, and then grandpa to get it. Gong fu parameters are better to get to it first, though.

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Bio

First Off, Current Targets:

Whispering Pines Alice
Good Luxurious Work Teas
Best Sachet Teas
Spring, Winter Taiwan High Mountain Oolongs

Dislikes: Heavy Tannin, Astringency, Bitterness, or Fake Flavor, Overly herby herbal or aged teas

Picky with: Higher Oxidation Oolongs, Red Oolongs (Some I love, others give me headaches or are almost too sweet), Mint Teas

Currently, my stash is overflowing. Among my favorites are What-Cha’s Lishan Black, Amber Gaba Oolong, Lishan Oolong, Qilan Oolong, White Rhino, Kenya Silver Needle, Tong Mu Lapsang Black (Unsmoked); Whispering Pines Alice, Taiwanese Assam, Wang’s Shanlinxi, Cuifeng, Dayuling, Jasmine Shan Lin Xi; Beautiful Taiwan Tea Co.“Old Style” Dong Ding, Mandala Milk Oolong; Paru’s Milk Oolong

Me:

I am an MSU graduate, and current alternative ed. high school social studies and history teacher. I formerly minored in anthropology, and I love Egyptian and classical history. I love to read, write, draw, paint, sculpt, fence(with a sword), practice calisthenics on rings, lift weights, workout, relax, and drink a cuppa tea…or twenty.

I’ve been drinking green and black teas ever since I was little living in Hawaii. Eastern Asian influence was prominent with my friends and where I grew up, so I’ve been exposed to some tea culture at a young age. I’ve come a long way since I began on steepster and now drink most teas gong fu, especially oolong. Any tea that is naturally creamy, fruity, or sweet without a lot of added flavoring ranks as a must have for me. I also love black teas and dark oolongs with the elusive “cocoa” note. My favorites are lighter Earl Greys, some white teas like What-Cha’s Kenyan offerings, most Hong-Cha’s, darker Darjeelings, almost anything from Nepal, Green Shan Lin Xi’s, and Greener Dong Dings. I’m in the process of trying Alishan’s. I also tend to really enjoy Yunnan Black or Red teas and white teas. I’m pickier with other teas like chamomile, green teas, and Masalas among several.

I used to give ratings, but now I only rate teas that have a strong impression on me. If I really like it, I’ll write it down.

I’ll enjoy a tea almost no matter what, even if the purpose is more medicinal, for it is my truest vice and addiction.

Location

Michigan, USA

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